Call for Papers – “Fanfiction in Medieval Studies: What Do We Mean When We Say ‘Fanfiction’?”

Call for Papers
“Fanfiction in Medieval Studies: What Do We Mean When We Say ‘Fanfiction’?”
52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies
Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 11-14, 2017
Organizer: Anna Wilson, anna.wilson@utoronto.ca
Deadline Sept 15

Over the past three decades, there has been increasing interest in both Fan Studies and Medieval Studies in the relationship between medieval literary culture and fan fiction (popular, ‘unofficial’, fan-generated creative writing that participates in a pre-existing fictional ‘universe’ and uses its characters). Many Fan Studies scholars have seen fanfiction as the heir to the premodern literary tradition in which authors adapt, rework, reinterpret or otherwise engages with a pre-existing literary work. Fan Studies scholars often refer to the Aeneid’s reworking of Homer, romances in the Alexander or Arthurian traditions,  or specific works, such as Robert Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid, as ‘early fan fiction’. Fanfiction scholars have also claimed the medieval ‘active reader’, whose creativity spilled into glosses, commentaries and exegesis, as part of the history of fanfiction writers.  Some medievalists have chafed at inaccurate representations of medieval literary culture by Fan Studies scholars, while many others have found that the analogy between the literary activity of fan communities and medieval literary cultures generates valuable and thought-provoking questions that have informed their own research or teaching.

At the first ever session on fanfiction in Medieval Studies at ICMS 2016, papers on such diverse subjects as marginal commentary on The Book of John Mandeville and Chinese fan subtitles of Disney’s Mulan showed the fertility of the idea of fanfiction for reframing the medieval reader, reading communities, affect, and modern medievalisms. However, panellists returned over and over to the question of how to use the term ‘fanfiction’ productively and accurately when discussing medieval practices and texts. Our 2017 proposed session, “What Do We Mean When We Say Fanfiction?” will invite papers that discuss medieval texts and practices with reflection on the following questions: what characterises fanfiction or fandom before the rise of the technologies – the printing press, the photocopier, the internet – without which it is impossible to imagine modern fandom? is it the intensity of readerly affect? the mere fact of rewriting or reinterpretation of a pre-existing text? resemblance to modern fanfiction tropes? the existence of a ‘virtual community’ of readers? How might using the term ‘fanfiction’ occlude or erase important details of the way medieval readers experienced texts? How might it bring to the fore elements previously neglected?

For further reading in Fan Studies, an up-to-date bibliography is maintained on Zotero, affiliated with the journal Transformative Works and Cultures. It can be found here: https://www.zotero.org/groups/11806.

Please submit abstracts of 300 words or less, and a Participation Information Form (available here: http://wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF) to Anna Wilson (anna.wilson@utoronto.ca).

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Beyond Word Exhibition Website

We are pleased to announce the launch of the Beyond Words website, which provides information about dates, venues, public programming, the symposium, and the catalogue of the upcoming exhibit Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections: http://BeyondWords2016.org

When the exhibit opens in mid-September, we will launch the object-centered portion of the website: a searchable database of all 260 manuscripts described in the catalogue, with essential metadata and images for each manuscript and, when available, codicological descriptions and full digital facsimiles.

Please visit the website regularly for updates and, if you use Twitter, follow @BeyondWords2016 for sneak-peeks, updates, and announcements. We hope to see you in Boston this fall.

– The Beyond Words Curatorial Team: Jeffrey Hamburger, William P. Stoneman, Anne-Marie Eze, Lisa Fagin Davis, and Nancy Netzer

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Manuscripts in the Curriculum

Les Enluminures is sponsoring a unique program that enables colleges, universities, and other educational institutions in North America and Canada to borrow a select group of diverse manuscripts dating from the thirteenth century onwards for teaching. The pilot program will run for three years on a semester basis starting in January 2017. Central to its philosophy is the integration of real manuscripts into the curriculum in courses where students can work closely with original material under the guidance of a professor. Exhibition of the manuscripts is also envisioned. There is a nominal fee that contributes to out-of-pocket expenses of the program. A description of the program, the schedule, teaching guidelines, and descriptions of the manuscripts are available online: http://www.textmanuscripts.com/curatorial-services/manuscripts.

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Call for Papers – Technical Communication in the Middle Ages

CFP: Technical Communication in the Middle Ages
International Congress on Medieval Studies (Kalamazoo, 2017)
Proposals due: September 15, 2016
Submit to Wendy Hennequin (mwhennequin@gmail.com)

Scholars have long recognized Chaucer’s “Treatise on the Astrolabe” as an early technical document, yet relatively few medieval texts have been discussed as specimens of technical communication. This session seeks to consider the traditions and conventions of medieval technical communication, as well as the connections between medieval and contemporary technical writing.

Possible texts for consideration might include (but are not limited to) penitential and conduct manuals, monastic rules, business correspondence, medical treatises, scientific and pseudo-scientific manuals (including alchemical and astrological ones), cookery books, law codes, and government and military documents. Papers should consider the texts as technical communication, but may focus on any aspect, including writing, layout, design, etc.

Please submit proposals to Wendy Hennequin (mwhennequin@gmail.com) by September 15, 2017.

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Call for Papers – Numa, Numa: The Life and Afterlife of the Second King of Rome

Numa, Numa: The Life and Afterlife of the Second King of Rome
13-14 October, 2017, Ann Arbor MI

Organizers: Celia E. Schultz (University of Michigan) and Mark R. Silk (Trinity College)

This conference aims to help correct modern scholarship’s oversight of the second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius – the foundational figure of Roman religion who also enjoyed a remarkably long, varied, and rich nachleben in Western thought, literature, and art. From the first century BCE into the nineteenth century, Numa personified the good monarch and emblemized how religion should (or, in the case of early Latin Christian intellectuals, should not) function in society. His paramour, the divine nymph Egeria, became the ideal for a male leader’s female helpmeet and advisor.  Numa appears in genres as disparate as Italian Renaissance and early modern French works on political theory; at least two seventeenth-century operas; paintings by Poussin and Lorain; poems by Milton, Byron, and Tennyson; letters of John Adams; a late eighteenth-century novel by the French writer J.P.C. de Florian, and the important nineteenth-century Icelandic poem, Numa Rimur. We hope to attract papers representing the fields of Classics, Comparative Literature, History, Political Science, Religion, Art History, and Music.

The conference will held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on 13-14 October 2017.

Among the subjects the conference will address are:

  1. The light Numa’s biography sheds on early Italic religion.
  2. Numa as a model of the good Roman emperor.
  3. Numa the bête noir of the Latin church fathers.
  4. How medieval and Renaissance humanists rehabilitated Numa as the father of civil religion.
  5. The use of Numa to criticize Christianity in the republican tradition.
  6. Numa as an exemplar for the papacy in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and for Enlightenment monarchy.
  7. The liaison of Numa and Egeria in art, poetry, and fiction.

We invite abstracts (500 words) for papers that will last 25 minutes. Abstracts should to be sent as email attachments to the conference account (numanumaconference@umich.edu) by 15 February, 2017. Notifications will be sent out no later than 15 March, 2017.

Confirmed speakers are Christopher Smith (British School at Rome), John J. Martin (History, Duke University), F. Jackson Bryce (Classics, Carleton College), Arelene Saxonhouse (Political Science, University of Michigan), Sara Ahbel-Rappe (Classical Studies, University of Michigan), Parrish Wright (Interdepartmental Program in Greek and Roman History, University of Michigan), Celia Schultz (Classical Studies, University of Michigan), Mark Silk (Religion, Trinity College), Jean-Marc Kehres (Language and Culture Studies, Trinity College).

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Jobs for Medievalists

Johns Hopkins University, History Department search for an Assistant or Associate Professor in Medieval European History:

The Johns Hopkins University Department of History seeks a full-time tenure-track Assistant or tenured Associate Professor of  medieval European History, region and period open, beginning July 1, 2017.  We favor candidates whose research makes broad intellectual connections and/or spans regions, whose publications and academic profile are innovative and outstanding, and who will continue our excellence in both undergraduate teaching and the training of graduate students for academic positions.  The search committee  is committed to hiring candidates who, through their research, teaching and/or service will contribute to the  diversity and excellence of the academic community.  PhD is required by time of appointment.  Please submit a cover letter, c.v., three letters of recommendation, research statement, and writing sample to Interfolio at: https://apply.interfolio.com/36153.  Review of completed applications will begin November 30.

Johns Hopkins University is committed to the active recruitment of a diverse faculty and student body. The University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members.  Consistent with the University’s goals of achieving excellence in all areas, we will assess the comprehensive qualifications of each applicant.

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Call for Papers – Ritual, Performance, and the Senses

Call for Papers:  Ritual, Performance, and the Senses
AVISTA Medieval Graduate Student Symposium
University of North Texas
March 23-24, 2017
Deadline for submission: February 1, 2017

The proliferation of images painted onto monumental structures, the illuminations of manuscripts, the intricacies of ivory carvings and the construction of architectural sculpture in the Medieval Period evince a highly visual culture. As such, medieval scholars have focused heavily on visual reception theory to ascertain the role of the visual within the fabric of medieval society.  Key to many studies is the pivotal role of rituals within the society, particularly in terms of how the medieval person would have absorbed their culture, namely the other senses. As performances would have involved not only the visual, but also the tactile, the aural, gustatory and olfactory, the combination of the sensory experience created a transitory environment within – or outside – the architectural structures that delineated the medieval world.

Ritual and the beginning of performative drama not only created a sensory experience but served to support pre-conceived societal distinctions. From the most exclusive performance, the mass, to the most public ritual, the intercity procession, rituals both enforced and challenged the social barriers of the time. As such, the development of rituals have a history all their own, from the most mundane acts of lay piety shown through blessings, to dramas focused on the lives of the saints and the life of Christ, to the most important feast days, and to the imperial rituals associated with the temporal sphere. Rituals were not confined only to the monastic or ecclesiastical environments, but permeated all segments of society.

The 2017 AVISTA medieval Graduate Student Symposium at the University of North Texas invites papers from all disciplines and all medieval eras on any topic, but preferences those that address topics of ritual, performance, or sensual experience. Such topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The interconnected use of the senses
  • Ritual history
  • The notion of Medieval Performance Art
  • Lay ritual/noble ritual
  • Manuscript as a performance
  • Sensual props, cues, and rubrications
  • Societal divisions created by rituals
  • Architecture as stage and backdrop
  • Processional routes/pilgrimages
  • Music and sensual stimulation
  • The archaeology of the senses
  • Landscape and topography of performance
  • The language of the senses
  • Sensual cosmology
  • Sensual dreprications

Send papers to: Dr. Mickey Abel (mickey.abel@unt.edu)

Submission deadline: February 1, 2017

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Call for Applications – Medieval Studies Visiting Scholars Program

In order to promote scholarly research, exchange, and conversation about the medieval world, the Committee on Medieval Studies welcomes a small number of non-stipendiary Visiting Scholars each academic year. Visiting Scholars may work in any field dealing with some aspect of medieval society, religion, or culture in Europe, Africa, or Eurasia, and are welcomed as full members of Harvard’s rich intellectual and social community of medievalists. Visiting Scholars may be appointed to terms ranging from three to six months. They enjoy full access to Harvard libraries and many other university facilities, an email account, and shared office space during the period of their appointment. They are expected to be engaged in research projects that draw upon Harvard’s manuscript, library, and other resources; to remain in residence in the Cambridge/Boston area during their appointment; to participate fully in the seminars, colloquia, and other activities of the Committee on Medieval Studies; and to share the results of their research in a seminar or other public venue. All applicants must have received the Ph.D., or equivalent terminal degree in their field, before the date on which they plan to begin their term as visiting scholars at Harvard.

 

Applications for Spring 2017 Visiting Scholars are now being accepted; the deadline for application is 10 September 2016. More information on the program, and application forms and requirements, can be found on the Medieval Studies website here

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Call for Papers – Othello’s Island

Call for Papers
Othello’s Island 2017

The 5th annual multidisciplinary conference on medieval, renaissance and early modern studies and their later legacies

Venue: Centre for Visual Arts and Research (CVAR)

Nicosia, Cyprus, 6 to 8 April 2017

with optional historic-site visits on 9 April

Acollaborative event organised by academics from CVAR, Northern Arizona University, Sheffield Hallam University, SOAS University of London the University of Kent and the University of Leeds

www.othellosisland.org

Convenors

  • Emeritus Professor James Fitzmaurice, Northern Arizona University (USA)
  • Professor Lisa Hopkins, Sheffield Hallam University (UK)
  • Dr Sarah James, University of Kent at Canterbury (UK)
  • Dr Michael Paraskos, SOAS University of London (UK)
  • Benedict Read FSA, University of Leeds (UK)
  • Dr Rita Severis, CVAR (Cyprus)

We welcome applications from researchers to present papers at the 2017 edition of Othello’s Island.

First held in 2013, Othello’s Island now a well established annual meeting of academics, students and members of the public interested in medieval and renaissance art, literature, history and culture.

Othello’s Island is growing in size and stature every year. In 2016 over seventy academics from across the world presented papers at the conference, whilst also experiencing the medieval and renaissance art, architecture and historical sites of Cyprus.

This experience ranged from the island’s material culture, such as the French gothic cathedral of Nicosia, through to the remarkable living culture of the island that is still deeply affected by its medieval and renaissance past.

In 2017 we are interested in hearing papers on diverse aspects of medieval and renaissance literature, art, history, society and other culture.

Papers do not have to be specifically related to Cyprus or the Mediterranean region and do not have to be connected to Shakespeare.

It is worth looking at the range of papers from past conferences to see that previous speakers have covered topics ranging from slavery in medieval Cyprus and Malta, to the impact of Italian Renaissance art on Cypriot Byzantine painting, to the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf and Margaret Cavendish.

That said, given our location, Cyprus, the Levant and the Mediterranean do impact on the conference. In part this is because Cyprus is a real gem for anyone interested in medieval and renaissance history. Experience from the conference over the past four years shows that for researchers interested in placing their text-based research in a material context, visiting the island adds a new dimension to their studies. This comes in part from the conference itself, but also from the rich treasury of architectural and other material culture relating to the period that is available on Cyprus.

Othello’s Island itself has developed a reputation as one of the friendliest medieval and renaissance studies conferences in the world today, and it is also genuinely interdisciplinary. In part this is due to the relatively small size of the event, which generates a true sense of community during the conference.

For more informaton and submission deadlines please visit
www.othellosisland.org

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Call for Papers – “Frater, Magister, Minister et Episcopus”

CALL FOR PAPERS

“Frater, Magister, Minister et Episcopus”
The Works and Worlds of Saint Bonaventure
The Franciscan Institute at St. Bonaventure University
July 12-15, 2017

The Franciscan Institute at St. Bonaventure University will host a major international conference dedicated to the intellectual heritage and contemporary significance of Saint Bonaventure.

Individual papers, panels, and workshop proposals are sought that engage the academic, pastoral, and socio-political aspects of this topic. Possible themes include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Bonaventure’s Theological Legacy and Contemporary Theology
  • Bonaventure’s Use of Philosophical and Theological Sources
  • Aesthetics, Art, and Bonaventure
  • The Franciscan Order under Bonaventure’s Leadership
  • Bonaventure as Preacher
  • Ecology, Pope Francis, and Bonaventure
  • The Image and Role of Women in Bonaventure’s Writings
  • Bonaventure, Franciscan Ministry, and Spirituality
  • Bonaventure and Thomas Aquinas
  • Bonaventure, Paris, and Medieval France

Proposals are due by November 18, 2016.  Notifications of acceptance, rejection or need for alterations will be sent to authors by January 13, 2017. Please send a paper proposal/ draft of your text via email no later than November 18, 2016, directly to:

Fr. David Couturier, OFM Cap.
Franciscan Institute St. Bonaventure University
Murphy Building – Room 100
St. Bonaventure, NY 14778
dcouturi@sbu.edu

Organizing Committee:

Joshua Benson (Catholic University)
Timothy J. Johnson (Flagler College)
Dominic Monti OFM (St. Bonaventure University)
Katherine Wrisley-Shelby (Boston College)
Marie Kolbe Zamora OSF (Silver Lake College)

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