Call for Papers – Mercenaries and Crusaders (1202-1480s)

The Hungary in Medieval Europe Research Group at the Department of History, University of Debrecen, the Centre for the History of Society and Culture (CHSC) of the University of Coimbra and the Histoire et Cultures de l’Antiquité et du Moyen Âge (HiscAnt-MA) Laboratoire of the University of Lorraine are pleased to announce that the interdisciplinary conference on Mercenaries and Crusaders (1202-1480s) will take place June 22–24 2022, at the University of Debrecen, Hungary.

Crusades and mercenaries were inextricably intertwined throughout the Middle Ages. Mercenaries were employed in and against crusading armies in all major theatres of war from the Middle East to Poland, particularly between 1202 (the siege of Zara/Zadar) and the 1480s (King Matthias Corvinus’ anti-Ottoman ventures). The history of crusades coincides with that of medieval mercenaries. Medieval mercenaries were the only soldiers for and against whom crusades were organised and conducted in the name of the Lord. To bring forward just a few examples, several popes from Innocent VI to Gregory XII tried to find a way out of the predicament caused by the mercenaries in France and Italy. Captains like Sir John Hawkwood or Arnaud de Cervole were often either excommunicated or recruited in the crusading enterprises in the 1360s. Amadeus VI, the Green Count of Savoy employed mercenaries in his crusade of Gallipoli. The Teutonic order recruited mercenaries from Bohemia, Silesia, and even from the West.

The organisers encourage thematic panels, but individual papers may also be submitted. Each paper – in a panel or independently – will be of a duration of 20 minutes. Panels preferably consisting of three to four papers should ideally include a brief 5-minute introductory presentation of their theme and rationale. All sessions will be followed by a brief discussion.

The conference does not have a specific theme, however, the organisers welcome panels and individual papers that fall under the following topics:

  • Mercenaries in the Hundred Years’ War
  • Mercenaries in the Holy Land
  • Mercenaries in the Baltic Crusades
  • Mercenaries in the Iberian Peninsula
  • Mercenaries and the Papal State
  • Condottieri in Italy
  • Crusades against Mercenaries in the Hundred Years’ War
  • Mercenaries in Central Europe
  • Mercenaries in Byzantine Armies
  • Mercenaries in the Crusades against the Ottomans
  • Crusades in the Holy Land, the Baltics, the Iberian Peninsula; against the Ottomans
  • Crusades against Christians
  • Crusades, Crusaders and the Holy See
  • Crusades and Crusaders in the Eastern Frontiers of Christendom
  • Recruitment
  • Ideology and Faith
  • Tactics and Strategy
  • Supply, Logistics, Equipment
  • Impact of Crusaders and Mercenaries` Armies on Non-combatants
  • Artillery and Engineers
  • Siege Warfare and Fortifications
  • Perception of Mercenaries in Narrative Literature

We are, however, open to any variations of the general theme.

All interested lecturers, researchers, independent scholars and PhD-students are invited to submit an abstract on our website using the conference abstract template: https://mercenariesandcrusaders.com/

Abstracts for individual papers should not exceed 400 words, while abstracts for papers that are part of a panel should be up to 300 words each. Additionally, panel proposals should also be accompanied by an abstract of up to 400 words on the general theme of the panel, explaining how the papers are interconnected and how they contribute to the theme. The latter is to be submitted by the panel leader only, i.e. the person taking the initiative to organise the panel.

The working languages of the conference are English, French and German.

The deadline for submission of proposals is 15 November 2021.

All panel and individual paper proposals will be examined by an international advisory board that will be appointed by the three institutions (Debrecen, Nancy, and Coimbra). The selection process is double blind, following the established academic practice for peer review. The Organising Committee will announce the results of the selection process by 31 January 2022.

The organisers will provide accommodation, light lunch and coffee breaks between the conference sessions.

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Jobs for Medievalists

Position Announcement: Early Materials Cataloger, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University

Position: Early Materials Cataloger

Department: Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

STARS Requisition: 64643BR

Minimum salary: $60,500

Yale University, conveniently located between Boston and New York, offers exciting opportunities for achievement and growth in New Haven, Connecticut. Located in the heart of historic downtown New Haven with more than 100 local boutiques, national retailers, cafés, casual eateries, award-winning restaurants, and world-renowned theaters, galleries, and museums.

General Purpose:

Reporting to the Head of the Rare Book Cataloging Unit, the Early Materials Cataloger creates, enhances, and maintains original and complex bibliographic and authority records for manuscript items and printed works, chiefly from the medieval through the early modern periods, in the fields of British and European literature, history, and the humanities. Plans, directs, and reviews work of cataloging assistants and student assistants. Assists in the ongoing development of the unit’s cataloging procedures for related collections. Completes special projects as assigned. Contributes to Yale University Library and University-wide initiatives and is expected to be active professionally.

This position represents an exciting opportunity for a scholar-librarian to work at the intersection of early materials cataloging and scholarship. We seek applicants interested in the politics of metadata, the materiality of the textual object, trends in forensic analysis, and the broader questions relating the creation, survival, transmission, ownership, description and use of special collections to their understanding within scholarship, the classroom, and the public spheres of the humanities. Applicants that meet the minimum education/experience qualifications are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant will receive intensive on-the-job training in manuscript and print cataloging and paleography if needed, according to the protocols of the department and library.

The Rare Book Cataloging Unit, part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library’s Technical Services Department, is responsible for cataloging material principally ranging from incunabula to twenty-first century publications.

The Beinecke Library is Yale’s principal repository for literary archives, early manuscripts, and rare books. One of the great collections in North America, the Beinecke collections are internationally known and heavily used by scholars from around the world. For further information about the Beinecke Library, consult the library’s web site at: http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/.

This position will be assigned a rank of Librarian 1 to Librarian 3. Librarian ranking information can be found at http://bit.ly/YULRanksPromotions. The minimum salary is $60,500.

Required Education and Experience:

1. Master’s degree from an American Library Association accredited library school. In selective cases a graduate degree in a related subject field may be substituted. 2. Demonstrated knowledge of current national cataloging/metadata content and structural standards. Knowledge of subject analysis and classification systems. 3. If supervision of professional and/or support staff is a principal responsibility, supervisory experience is required. 4. Experience designing projects and bringing them to conclusion in a timely fashion. 5. Demonstrated excellent oral, written, and interpersonal communications; analytical ability; accuracy and attention to detail. 6. Ability to initiate and adapt to change. 7. Experience working collegially and cooperatively within and across organizations. 8. Experience working collaboratively and independently with varied groups within a complex organization and rapidly changing, team environment.

Qualifications:

  • Strong knowledge of medieval and early modern European literature or history, and broad knowledge in the humanities, as demonstrated through academic degrees or an equivalent combination of training or experience.
  • Advanced reading knowledge of Latin, including neo-Latin and Latin abbreviations.
  • Good knowledge of Latin and English paleography, and broad knowledge of medieval European paleography 1100-1600, including both book and document scripts.
  • Good reading ability in Middle English and/or Middle French, in addition to Italian, French, German or another European vernacular.
  • Preferred Education and Experience: MA or PhD in European history or literature specializing in a field relating to pre-1800 British and European collections. Demonstrated knowledge of the material culture of medieval and early modern books. Good reading knowledge of paleography for a European language beyond Latin and English. Experience creating MARC records. Cataloging experience using DCRM, AMREMM, DACS, AACR2, and/or RDA.

Application: For more information and immediate consideration, please apply online at https://bit.ly/YaleCareers-64643BR. Please be sure to reference this website when applying for this position.

We invite you to discover the excitement, diversity, rewards and excellence of a career at Yale University. One of the country’s great workplaces, Yale University offers exciting opportunities for meaningful accomplishment and true growth. Our benefits package is among the best anywhere, with a wide variety of insurance choices, liberal paid time off, fantastic family and educational benefits, a variety of retirement benefits, extensive recreational facilities, and much more.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to and does not discriminate on the basis of an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

OR

AA/EEO – M/F/Disability/Vetera

https://your.yale.edu/careersv

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Message from Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski to the Members of the MAA

Dear Colleagues,

The recent wave of hate crimes against Asian Americans and people of Pacific Islander descent culminated in the horrific murders near Atlanta last week. Our Asian American and PI colleagues have been facing this kind of terror and discrimination for a long time and it is time for us to reflect on what our responsibility is as medievalists – as students, teachers, and scholars – in thinking through the history of hate, racism, and scapegoating minority groups and to formulate calls to action. The American Historical Association has documented the long history of discrimination and racism against Asian Americans in a recent statement. The upcoming Annual Meeting of the MAA’s Committee on Centers and Regional Associations (CARA) will include a breakout session focusing on how we can better support our AAPI and BIPOC colleagues and students, and the Council of the Medieval Academy of America is working intensively on a meaningful response to the anguish, fury, and exasperation our AAPI colleagues experience at this fraught moment.

Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, President
renatebk80@gmail.com

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Self-nominations for Volunteers to Serve as Contributing Reviewers of Proposals for Sponsored and Special Sessions

The International Congress on Medieval Studies, hosted by the Medieval Institute at Western Michigan University, is now accepting self-nominations for volunteers to serve as contributing reviewers of proposals for Sponsored and Special Sessions for the 57th and 58th congresses (2022 and 2023). The deadline for self-nomination is April 1: wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions/selection.

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Fragmentarium Video Conference – “Evidence Preserved by Destruction: Recycling Medieval Manuscript Fragments in Transylvania during the (Counter)Reformation.”

A Fragmentarium Video Conference will take place on Friday, 26 March 2021 at 16:00 Central European Time:

Dr. Adrian Papahagi (Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania)

“Evidence Preserved by Destruction: Recycling Medieval Manuscript Fragments in Transylvania during the (Counter)Reformation.”

(please register to this link)
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIkceivqzIsHNNLxdELus7pJp8NbAcUevXr

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Rare Book School Still Accepting Applications!

First-round admissions decisions for our 2021 summer courses will be announced soon. If you missed the first deadline, it’s not too late! Apply to any of our 35 courses, including:

–C-75c: Introduction to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, taught by Cheryl Beredo, Joy Bivins, Michelle Commander, Tammi Lawson, Shola Lynch, and Michael Mery (6 hours)
–G-85c: Why Black Bibliography Matters, taught by Kinohi Nishikawa (6 hours)
–H-90a: Teaching the History of the Book, taught by Michael F. Suarez, S.J. (22 hours)
–H-105a: The Bible and Histories of Reading, taught by Peter Stallybrass, with Lynne Farrington (22 hours)
–H-170b: Spanish American Textual Technologies to 1700, taught by Hortensia Calvo, Christine Hernandez, and Rachel Stein (10 hours)
–H-180c: Six Degrees of Phillis Wheatley, taught by Tara Bynum (6 hours)
–H-185c: African American Print Cultures in the Nineteenth-Century United States, taught by Derrick R. Spires (6 hours)
–I-45b: The Photographic Book since 1843, taught by Richard Ovenden (10 hours)
–M-100a: Fragmentology, taught by Lisa Fagin Davis (22 hours)

Please submit your applications by midnight (ET) on Monday, 22 March to be considered in the next round. As always, applications will be considered on a rolling basis until all seats are filled. If you have questions about the courses, please contact rbsprograms@virginia.edu.

With best regards,
The RBS Programs Team

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CARA Annual Meeting – Sunday, 18 April 2021

CARA Annual Meeting
SUNDAY, 18 April 2021

18:00 GMT / 13:00 ET / 10:00 PT
(following the CARA Plenary Session)

Separate registration (free of charge) is required for the CARA Annual Meeting. Registering for the MAA Annual Meeting does not register you for the CARA Annual Meeting, and you do not need to register for the MAA Annual Meeting in order to attend the CARA Annual Meeting.

Use this link to register for the CARA Annual Meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0ofuyhqzgtEtJM0dQyW5Ht1YK-c9vmd4Vh

1:00–1:15 PM:
Welcome and Introductions, CARA Chair, Anne E. Lester

Approval of new CARA Chair (Sean Gilsdorf) and new Executive Committee Members

CARA SESSION: Surviving and Thriving through a Time of Crisis: Conversations on Envisioning Medieval Studies in the US at the Close of the Centenary

The past year has presented innumerable challenges, professionally, personally, structurally, and for Medieval Studies in particular. It has been a time of profound loss and reckoning but also for imagining new futures. Inspired by the conversations and dialogues convened 2020 by the MAA’s Inclusivity and Diversity Committee and The Folger Library’s Critical Race Conversations, and adapting to the online forum, this year’s CARA meeting will feature a series of critical conversations aimed at guiding us forward through this time of crisis. Recognizing that CARA’s members offer different sets of experiences and expertise, we hope to learn from and with each other about strategies for moving our programs, curricula, and outreach initiatives forward in new ways. The challenges generated by the 2020 Covid pandemic, by systemic racism, civil unrest, and a constricted job market, among other issues, mark an important moment of assessment in the final years of the MAA’s first century. This is also a moment to begin to re-envision the future of medieval studies and to consider how CARA can work to support all medievalists – whether in academic positions or working outside the academy – and to help us stay connected as Medieval Studies communities.

This year’s meeting will take a new shape. Eschewing the model of three stand-alone presentations, we will take up a set of interlocking conversations. We will introduce our panel of discussants and they will offer a few brief remarks. We will then break into smaller, facilitated, break-out groups for 30 minutes to discuss a common set of three critical questions (see below). We will then reconvene to pose those questions, among others, to our panel of discussants as part of a larger conversation (45 minutes) focused on stories from the crises and how to envision ways forward for Medieval Studies, thinking in particular about what it means to both to ‘survive’ and to ‘thrive’ as individuals and communities. There will be time for questions at the end (15 minutes). There is no doubt that we are made stronger together, through shared values and collective insights. Our goal is to make available our collective wisdom, to learn from our experiences, and to draw up some guidelines for the future. Indeed, what do we envision as the role of Medieval Studies going forward?

1:15-1:45 PM: [Small group discussions will be facilitated by CARA Executive Committee members]

Break-out Conversations focused on shared questions:

Participants are encouraged to share and draw from their own experiences – negative and positive – in these discussions.

1) Given the challenges of budget cuts, institutional shortfalls, and the disappearance of many departments and programs in the wake of Covid, in what ways can we strategize to increase engagement with Medieval Studies to facilitate enrollments and encourage a longer and more inclusive perspective on the past?

2) Acknowledging that many institutions and disciplines have their roots in systemic racist perspectives and structures and that many have programs to build up diversity and inclusivity, how can we more fully address promotion and integration beyond inclusivity and diversity in our teaching, administration, and scholarly practices? What sorts of critical habits of thought can we take up and put into practice to build forward a more critical form of Medieval Studies? How can we center the lives and resistances of BIPOC and AAPI communities so that we can move beyond abstraction and theories, and tend to the lived experiences of our BIPOC and Asian American and Pacific Islanders students particularly at a moment when they are experiencing the trauma of the recent Atlanta shootings and other acts of violence?

3) This year of the pandemic has made clear how precarious our profession is in many places and instances. Joblessness, isolation, and a lack of resources have made being a medievalist untenable in many cases. We ask discussants to reflect on the document, Supporting MedievALLists: Best Practices for Centers and Regional Associations put forward in 2020. What strategies can we envision to address increasing precarity among PhDs, junior faculty, students, adjunct instructors, and independent scholars? How can we better define our notion of community?

1:45-2:00 PM: Break

2:00-2:45 PM: Panel Discussion: Surviving and Thriving

Invited Panel Discussants:
Moira Fitzgibbons (Marist College)
Gina Brandolino (University of Michigan)
Nicole Lopez Jantzen (Borough of Manhattan Community College-CUNY)
Valerie Michelle Wilhite (International Medieval Society-Paris, Americas Director).

2:45- 3:00 PM: Questions & Discussion

We will follow up after the meeting with an additional questionnaire about your affiliation, program, center, and perspectives with an eye to creating a digital database and CARA mailing list for the future.

We look forward to seeing you virtually this April and to engaging CARA members in this new forum for discussion.

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New ASCSA Fellowships: Study at the Gennadius Library in Music and Urban Architecture

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is pleased to announce two new fellowships for study at the Gennadius Library: the Schwarz Fellowship for Research on Music and the Schwarz Fellowship for Research on Urban Architecture. The deadline for applications is April 30, 2021.

Here are brief overviews of the two fellowships, and you can find more information below the signature and in the attached documents:

The Schwarz Fellowship for Research on Music supports research on music that focuses on cultural interactions in the Mediterranean world broadly defined. The fellowship aims to promote the study of interactions among Western European, Byzantine, Islamic and Jewish cultures from the medieval to the modern period. Eligibility: Career musicians, or researchers who are either currently PhD candidates or have received their PhD within the last 5 years.

The Schwarz Fellowship for Research on Urban Architecture supports innovative and cross-disciplinary research on architecture, urban planning, and the history of the built environment in Greece from 1821 to the present. Eligibility: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D. holders within five years of receiving the degree. Open to all nationalities.

American School of Classical Studies at Athens
6-8 Charlton Street
Princeton, NJ 08540-5232
Telephone: +1 609-454-6819 (direct dial)
Website: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr


SCHWARZ FELLOWSHIP AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY FOR RESEARCH ON MUSIC
Deadline: April 30, 2021

The Schwarz Fellowship for Research on Music supports research on music that focuses on cultural interactions in the Mediterranean world broadly defined. The fellowship aims to promote the study of interactions among Western European, Byzantine, Islamic and Jewish cultures from the medieval to the modern period.

Eligibility: Career musicians, or researchers who are either currently PhD candidates or have received their PhD within the last 5 years.

Fields of Study: Musical composition; Music conducting; History of Music; Musicology; and related fields. Fellows will be expected to conduct a program of original research on a theme related to the collections of the Gennadius Library.

Terms: A stipend of $11,500 plus room, board, and waiver of School fees. Fellows are expected to be in residence at the School for the full academic year from early September to late May. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA be contributed to the Gennadius Library. Fellows are expected to participate in the academic life of the School.

Application: Submit an online application form for the “Schwarz Fellowship at the Gennadius Library for Research on Music.” An application consists of a curriculum vitae, description of the proposed project (up to 750 words), and three letters of reference to be submitted online. Student applicants must submit transcripts. Scans of official transcripts are acceptable.
Link to online application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/189405/schwarz-fellowship-at-the-gennadius-library-for-research-on-music

The award will be announced by mid-June.

SCHWARZ FELLOWSHIP AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY FOR RESEARCH ON URBAN ARCHITECTURE
Deadline
: April 30, 2021

The Schwarz Fellowship for Research on Urban Architecture supports innovative and cross-disciplinary research on architecture, urban planning, and the history of the built environment in Greece from 1821 to the present.

Eligibility: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D. holders within five years of receiving the degree. Open to all nationalities.

Fields of Study: Includes Architectural and Urban Design, History of Architecture, History of the City, Historical Geography, and related fields. Projects should incorporate the holdings of the Gennadius Library (maps, topographical plans, landscapes etc.) and other appropriate resources of the American School of Classical Studies.

Terms: A stipend of $11,500 plus room, board, and waiver of School fees. Fellows are expected to be in residence at the School for the full academic year from early September to late May. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA be contributed to the Gennadius Library. Fellows are expected to participate in the academic life of the School.

Application: Submit an online application form for the “Schwarz Fellowship at the Gennadius for Research on Urban Architecture.” An application consists of a curriculum vitae, description of the proposed project (up to 750 words), and three letters of reference to be submitted online. Student applicants must submit transcripts. Scans of official transcripts are acceptable.
Link to online application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/189403/schwarz-fellowship-at-the-gennadius-for-research-on-urban-architecture

Website: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/research/gennadius-library/educational-programs/fellowships
Email: application@ascsa.org

The awards will be announced by mid-June.

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Register for the 2021 Annual Meeting by March 25

Registration for the 96th Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America closes on March 25. No registrations can be accepted after that date.

The meeting is hosted by Indiana University, Bloomington, and will take place entirely online, from 15-18 April 2021. The program and registration information are available here.

We wish we could welcome you in person to Bloomington, but we look forward to an interesting and exciting conference!

Please email any questions to maa2021@indiana.edu.

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GSC Events at the 2021 MAA Annual Meeting

The MAA Graduate Student Committee is hosting a variety of events at the 2021 MAA Annual Meeting. Please join us for any or all. Click here to register for the Annual Meeting and access the GSC events: https://maa2021.indiana.edu/. We hope to see you there!

Transcription Workshop & Transcribathon

Thursday, 15 April
22:00 GMT / 18:00 ET / 15:00 PT

Join the IU Medieval Studies Institute Graduate Student Advisory Committee and the MAA Graduate Student Committee for an evening Transcription Workshop and weekend-long Transcribathon. Liz Hebbard will lead a manuscript transcription workshop Thursday evening to start off IU’s annual Transcribathon, which will run from Thursday-Saturday (April 15-17). No prior experience with manuscripts is necessary.

Graduate Student Social Hour

Thursday, 15 April
00:00 GMT / 20:00 ET / 17:00 PT

Join the MAA Graduate Student Committee and the IU Medieval Studies Institute Graduate Student Advisoy Committee for the graduate student virtual social hour at the MAA Annual Meeting. Drop in for an hour of connecting and conversation with fellow medievalist graduate students.

Mentoring and Morning Coffee

Friday, 16 April
14:00 GMT / 10:00 ET / 07:00 PT

Join the MAA Inclusivity & Diversity and Graduate Student Committees for a Mentoring and Morning Coffee at the MAA Annual Meeting. This mentoring event is designed to bring together medievalists at different points in their academic careers, from graduate students to senior scholars, and from across different fields, for an hour of conversation and mentorship.

Roundtable: Graduate Medievalists and the Institutions We Work In: Community and
Activism

Friday, 16 April
15:00 GMT / 11:00 ET / 08:00 PT

Session Sponsored by the MAA Graduate Student Committee and the IU Medieval Studies Institute Graduate Student Advisory Committee

Chair: Lauren Van Nest (University of Virginia)

Roundtable Participants: Abby Ang (Indiana University Bloomington), Christine Bachman (University of Delaware), Henry Gruber (Harvard University), Marian Homans-Turnbull (UC Berkeley), Nahir I. Otaño Gracia (University of New Mexico), Alexa Sand (Utah State University)

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