Summer Seminars in Greece

ASCSA SUMMER SEMINARS
DEADLINE: January 10, 2020

The Summer Seminars of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens are 18-day sessions designed for those who wish to study specific topics in Greece and visit major monuments with exceptional scholars as study leaders, and to improve their understanding of the country’s landscape, history, literature, and culture.

For Summer 2020, the two seminars are:
Aegean Networks of Technology (June 8 to June 26, 2020)

This seminar will explore four fundamental technologies in ancient Greece (ceramics, wood-working, stone carving, and bronze-casting) and how craft practitioners shared their expertise in multi-craft projects, such as building a boat or a temple. Participants will discover how these networks of technology developed in a broad Aegean context, from Athens and Corinth on the mainland to the Cycladic islands of Naxos, Paros, and Santorini, and in a deep time frame, from prehistory to contemporary traditional practices. Taught by Professor Eleni Hasaki (University of Arizona).

The Northern Aegean: Macedon and Thrace (July 2 to July 20, 2020)
In this seminar, participants will explore the Northern Aegean region during various time periods. The history of Macedon and Thrace bridges the East and West and offers a glimpse into some of the most significant developments in Greek history, such as colonization, cross-cultural relations, the Persian Wars, Athenian hegemony, and the rise of Macedon. Taught by Professors Amalia Avramidou (Democritus University of Thrace) and Denise Demetriou (University of California, San Diego).

Eligibility: Enrollment is open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, as well as to high school and college instructors of classics and related subjects. Each seminar is limited to twenty participants. The language of instruction is English. Applicants who are not enrolled or teaching at English-speaking institutes, or schools, may be required to supply evidence of proficiency in English.

Cost: The fee for each summer 2020 Seminar is $2,750. This includes tuition, room for the entire 18-day period, partial board in Athens, travel within Greece, and museum and site fees. International airfare, most meals outside Athens, and incidental expenses are the participant’s responsibility. Financial aid is available in the form of ASCSA scholarships, awarded on the basis of academic merit, and many classical professional organizations have funding opportunities. More information at https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/summer-session/ss-scholarships. Inquire about course credit option.

Application:  Applicants will complete an online application, for which they will submit pdf scans of academic transcripts (unofficial transcripts are acceptable) and arrange for the online submission of two letters of recommendation by the application deadline, January 10, 2020. All applicants will be notified in February 2020. More information and online application form are available through the website at: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/115820/ascsa-summer-seminar-application-18-day-sessions.
For more information on the seminars, view the website at https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/summerseminars or email ssapplication@ascsa.org.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership or application for employment.

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Summer Session in Greece

ASCSA SUMMER SESSION
DEADLINE: January 10, 2020

The Summer Session program of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens is a six-week session designed for those who wish to become acquainted with Greece and its major monuments, and to improve their understanding of the country’s landscape, history, material culture, and literature from antiquity to the present.

The 2020 Summer Session runs from June 15 to July 29, 2020, and its Director is Professor J. Matthew Harrington of Tufts University.

Format: The ASCSA Summer Session has provided the most extensive exposure to Greece, ancient and modern, for generations of students of Classics and related fields. It has a strong academic component with participants researching and presenting topics on site and offers unique opportunities to interact with eminent archaeologists in the field. Roughly half of the session is spent in travel throughout Greece. Three trips give participants an introduction to the major archaeological sites and museum collections throughout the country. The remainder of the session is devoted to study of the museums and monuments of Athens and the surrounding area with day trips to such sites as Marathon, Sounion, and Eleusis. The Summer Session’s commitment to presenting a comprehensive view of Greece’s rich history and archaeology leads to long days and extensive walking in the hot Mediterranean summer. Participants should be prepared for a rigorous program of study.

Eligibility: Enrollment is open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and to high school and college instructors of classics and related subjects. Enrollment is limited to twenty participants. The language of instruction is English. Applicants who are not enrolled or teaching at English-speaking colleges, universities, or schools, may be required to supply evidence of proficiency in English.

Cost: The fee for the 2020 program is $4,900. This includes tuition, room for the entire six-week period, partial board in Athens, travel within Greece, and museum and site fees. International airfare, most meals outside Athens, and incidental expenses are the participant’s responsibility. Financial aid is available in the form of ASCSA scholarships, awarded on the basis of academic merit, and many classical professional organizations have funding opportunities. More information at: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/summer-session/ss-scholarships.

Application: Applicants will complete an online application, for which they will submit pdf scans of academic transcripts (unofficial transcripts are acceptable) and arrange for the online submission of two letters of recommendation by the application deadline, January 10, 2020. All applicants will be notified in February, 2020. More information and the online application form are available through the website at https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/summer-session.
Link to application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/115817/ascsa-summer-session-application
E-mail: ssapplication@ascsa.org

Link to more information onlinehttps://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/summer-session

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership or application for employment.

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Humanities for All: Help NHA Promote Publicly Engaged Humanities Work!

In summer 2018, the National Humanities Alliance launched Humanities for All, with the support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to document and promote publicly engaged humanities research, teaching, preservation, and programming in U.S. higher education. The initiative brings together over 1,500 examples, showcasing the range of humanities work conducted with and for communities by scholars at universities, colleges, and scholarly societies across the United States.

To keep pace with the growth and increasing diversity of publicly engaged work across the humanities, they are writing to invite recommendations of work to include in the Humanities for All website.

If you are aware of publicly engaged research, teaching, preservation, or programming that should be included in Humanities for All, they would be grateful if you submitted its information at:
https://forms.gle/uWthLd3fwdhWsXPf8

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Conferences – “Imagining Pilgrimage to Santiago: Itineraries, Narratives, Myths”

“Imagining Pilgrimage to Santiago: Itineraries, Narratives, Myths”

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

The Duke House
1 East 78th Street
New York, New York 10075

24-25 April 2020

In collaboration with the government of Galicia, the Institute of Fine Arts is helping to inaugurate yearlong activities for “Xacobeo 2021,” the Jacobean holy year, with a symposium on 24-25 April 2020.  Papers for “Imagining Pilgrimage to Santiago: Itineraries, Narratives, Myths” will address the confrontation of real and imagined pilgrimage, exploring phenomenological and sensorial aspects, the visionary and eschatological implications of spiritual travel, spatial and material agency, and landscape and cartographic geographies of pilgrimage, among others.  Speakers include:  Kathryn Brush, Thomas Deswarte, James D’Emilio, Elvira Fidalgo, Elina Gertsman, Melanie Hanan, Patrick Henriet, Dominique Iogna-Prat, F. López Alsina, Wendy Pullan, Rocio Sánchez Ameijeiras, Alison Stones, Stefan Trinks, Michele Vescovi, Rose Walker. More information may be found at the Institute’s Events webpage in early 2020 (https://www.nyu.edu/gsas/dept/fineart/events/index.htm) or by contacting the organizers R. Maxwell (Institute of Fine Arts: robert.maxwell@nyu.edu) and M. Castiñeiras (Univ. Autònoma Barcelona: Manuel.Castineiras@uab.cat)

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12th Annual Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

November 21-23, 2019

In partnership with the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies (SIMS) at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to announce the 12th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

The concept of linked open data is the holy grail of the digital humanities. Yet the problem of how to link information across platforms has existed since civilization began. As knowledge and learning expanded in premodern society, the problems associated with collecting, combining, and disseminating information inspired new approaches to and technologies for the material text. In the internet age, we continue to grapple with the same problems and issues. While technologies have changed, the questions remain the same.

This year’s symposium explores the connections between historic and current approaches to data linkage in regard to manuscripts and manuscript research. Hooking Up addresses the topic from a variety of angles and considers how the manuscript book operates as a vehicle for information retrieval and dissemination from the technology of the page and the textual apparatus of a book, to the library, and finally, the internet. We will also consider such questions as how medieval practices of memory shaped information retrieval and gathering, how did the technology of the manuscripts book—in all its many forms—facilitate or hinder information processing, how can medieval solutions inform modern technologies, and how do modern technologies illuminate medieval practices? The program will also feature sessions highlighting projects that are advancing linked data technologies for manuscript researchers, including the T-AP Digging Into Data Challenge project Mapping Manuscript Migrations.

The program will begin Thursday evening, November 21, 5:00 pm, at the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Parkway Central Library, with a keynote address by Professor Mary Carruthers, New York University, and All Souls College, Oxford University. The symposium will continue November 22nd-23rd at the Kislak Center of Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania.

Other speakers include:

  • Benjamin L. Albritton, Stanford Libraries
  • Toby Burrows, e-Research Centre, Oxford University,
  • Matthew Driscoll, Arnamagnæan Institute, University of Copenhagen
  • Christoph Flüeler, University of Fribourg
  • Katarzyna Anna Kapitan, Museum of National History, Frederiksborg Castle & Arnamagnæan Institute, University of Copenhagen
  • Mikko Koho, Semantic Computing Research Group, Aalto University
  • Jehnna Lewis, University of Pennsylvania
  • Megan C. McNamee, Warburg Institute
  • Aylin Malcolm, University of Pennsylvania
  • David R. Nelson, University of Pennsylvania
  • Sally Ragep, Institute of Islamic Studies, McGill University
  • Lynn Ransom, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies
  • Helmut Reimitz, Princeton University
  • Linda Safran, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto
  • Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania
  • Elly Truitt, Bryn Mawr College
  • Kelly Tuttle, University of Pennsylvania Libraries
  • Nancy Um, Binghamton University
  • Athanasios Velios, Ligatus, University of the Arts London
  • Hanno Wijsman, Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes
  • Jeffrey Witt, Loyola University Maryland
  • Elizabeth Yale, University of Iowa
  • Kıvılcım Yavuz, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, University of Kansas

Registration fee is $35 ($10 for students with valid student ID).  Online registration closes Thursday, November 21, at noon. Walk-in registrations will be accepted for a fee of $45 ($15 for students with valid student ID) to be paid in cash. Please register here.

For more information on the Schoenberg Symposium Series, click here.

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The 3rd Paul E. Szarmach Prize

The Richard Rawlinson Center at Western Michigan University announces the third Paul E. Szarmach Prize, to be awarded in May 2020. It consists of an award of $500 to the author of a first article on a topic in the culture and history of early medieval England published in a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that is judged by the selection committee to be of outstanding quality.  To be eligible for the 2020 prize, the article must have appeared in a journal bearing a publication date of 2018. Application deadline: November 1.

https://wmich.edu/medieval/research/anglo-saxon/article-prize

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ASCSA Programs and Fellowships, 2020-2021

STUDY IN GREECE 2020-2021
ASCSA PROGRAMS AND FELLOWSHIPS

For more see: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/apply

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens was founded in 1881 to provide American graduate students and scholars a base for their studies in the history and civilization of the Greek world. Today it is still a teaching institution, providing graduate students a unique opportunity to study firsthand the sites and monuments of Greece. The School is also a superb resource for students and senior scholars pursuing research in many fields ranging from prehistoric to modern Greece, thanks to its internationally renowned libraries, the Blegen, focusing on all aspects of Greece from its earliest prehistory to late antiquity, and the Gennadius, which concentrates on the medieval to modern Greek world, as well as the Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Sciences.

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA
(FULL ACADEMIC YEAR AND SUMMER PROGRAMS)

REGULAR MEMBER FELLOWSHIPS: Up to twelve fellowships are available for the School’s Regular Members. Fellowships provide a stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall on the School grounds and waiver of School fees. Regular Member fellowships are awarded for the entire nine-month program. All awards are made on the recommendation of the Committee on Admissions and Fellowships and are based on the results of the qualifying examinations and materials submitted with the application. Fellowships include two in archaeology, one in history and literature, and nine unrestricted as to field. $50 application fee.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

STUDENT ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: For advanced graduate students who plan to pursue independent research projects and do not wish to commit to the full Regular Program. DEADLINE: ROLLING

ADVANCED FELLOWSHIPS: Several fellowships for the full academic year at the School with a stipend of $11,500 plus room, board, and waiver of School fees are available to students who have completed the Regular Program or one full year as a Student Associate Member and plan to return to the School to pursue independent research, usually for their Ph.D. dissertation.Advanced Fellowships fields awarded by the School include one each in art and architecture of antiquity, history of architecture, Mycenaean archaeology or Athenian architecture and/or archaeology, and the study of pottery; and three unrestricted as to field.
DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 15, 2020.

FULBRIGHT FELLOWSHIPS:  Visit the Fulbright website (http://us.fulbrightonline.org/home.html) for fellowship details and stipend information. Simultaneous application to both the Fulbright and the ASCSA is required. Candidates must submit the ASCSA application by the due date for the Fulbright application.
DEADLINE: OCTOBER 8, 2019.

OSCAR BRONEER TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidate or recent Ph.D. (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) and former Member of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) for study in Rome using the American Academy in Rome (AAR) as a base from which to pursue work through trips to sites, museums, or repositories of materials of interest to the Fellow’s studies. Minimum of three and a maximum of six months. The award is for a maximum of $30,000.
DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2020.

SUMMER SESSION: Six-week students, and secondary school and college teachers. Fee of $4,900 includes tuition, travel within Greece, room, and partial board. Scholarships available.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 10, 2020.

SUMMER SEMINARS: Two 18-day sessions designed for those who wish to study specific topics in Greece and visit major monuments with exceptional scholars as study leaders, and to improve their understanding of the country’s landscape, archaeology, material culture, history, literature, and culture. Enrollment is open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and to high school and college instructors of classics and related subjects. Fee of $2,750 includes tuition, travel within Greece, room, partial board in Athens, and museum and site fees. Scholarships available.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 10, 2020.

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTGRADUATES FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA (FULL ACADEMIC YEAR)

THE M. ALISON FRANTZ FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D.s (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) for work in the Gennadius Library. A stipend of $11,500 plus room, board, and waiver of School fees.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

THE JACOB HIRSCH FELLOWSHIP: For projects carried out in Greece; eligibility is limited to U.S. or Israeli citizens, Ph.D. candidate writing a dissertation or recent Ph.D. (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) revising a dissertation for publication. A stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at the ASCSA, and waiver of School fees.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS OR POSTGRADUATES FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA (SHORT-TERM FELLOWSHIPS)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (AIA) ANNA C. AND OLIVER C. COLBURN FELLOW:  Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D.s (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) whose field is classical archaeology. Visit the Archaeological Institute of America website for more information. Simultaneous application to both the AIA and the ASCSA is required. Two fellowships of $5,500 each. Fellowship runs in even years.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

THE HARRY BIKAKIS FELLOWSHIP: North American or Greek graduate students researching ancient Greek law or Greek graduate students working on a School excavation. A stipend of $1,875. School fees are waived.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

COTSEN TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP FOR RESEARCH IN GREECE:  Short-term travel award of $2,000 for senior scholars and graduate students for projects and research at the Gennadius Library. At least one month of residency required. School fees are waived.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

THE GEORGE PAPAIOANNOU FELLOWSHIP: Awarded to both senior and early career scholars – including PhD candidates – of any nationality researching Greece in the 1940’s and the post-war period, civil wars and the history of the Second World War. Fellows are required to make use of and refer to the George Papaioannou Papers housed at the Archives of the Gennadius Library. Stipend of €2,000. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

THE HENRY S. ROBINSON CORINTH RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidate or Ph.D. for research on a doctoral dissertation or primary publication specifically on Corinth, requiring the use of the resources, archaeological site, and collections at the ASCSA excavations at Ancient Corinth. Open to all nationalities. One or more grants for up to three months, maximum amount of stipend is $4,000. School fees are waived. Runs every other year.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

WIENER LABORATORY RESEARCH ASSOCIATE APPOINTMENTS: Short-term funding for Ph.D. candidates and postdoctoral scholars from colleges and universities worldwide pursuing archaeological research related to the ancient Greek world at the Wiener Laboratory. Variable amounts up to $7,000. Term variable, up to nine months.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020

TRAVELING AND EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTGRADUATE STUDY

COULSON/CROSS AEGEAN EXCHANGE, Program of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC):  Short-term fellowships for Greek nationals and scholars to pursue research in Turkey under the auspices of the American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT). Stipend of $250 per week plus up to $500 for travel expenses. Submit online application to ASCSA.
DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2020.

MULTI-COUNTRY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS, Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC): Ph.D. candidates and postdoctoral scholars with research in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences requiring travel to several countries with an American overseas research center. Consult CAORC website for application and deadline: www.caorc.org.

THE PAUL REHAK MEMORIAL TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP: Regular members and Student Associate members already attending the School for the entire academic year. Grant of $1,000 or grants of lesser amounts. School fees are waived. The purpose is to allow individuals to travel in Greece and Italy to conduct a research project during the current academic year from September 1, 2019 to July 1, 2020. Compensation for travel that transpired during the prior fall and winter terms or planned for the spring term of the 2019-2020 academic year will be considered.
DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2020.

FUNDING FOR SENIOR SCHOLARS FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA

KRESS PUBLICATIONS FELLOWSHIPS: Postdoctoral scholars working on assigned material from excavations at Ancient Corinth, the Athenian Agora, Lerna, and affiliated projects of the ASCSA to support research for publication of the excavated material. Grants for at least three months (up to $10,000) to a maximum of nine months (up to $30,000).
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020.

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH) FELLOWSHIPS: Awards for postdoctoral scholars and professionals in the humanities. Terms: Two to four fellows will be selected for awards of 4, 5, or 9-month duration. The monthly stipend per fellow is $4,200 allocated from a total pool of $75,600 per year. School fees are waived. U.S. citizens or foreign nationals being U.S. residents for three years before application deadline. Applicants must hold their Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree at the time of application. Submit online application to ASCSA.
DEADLINE: OCTOBER 31, 2019.

WIENER LABORATORY POST-DOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP (2020-2023): Three-year fellowship for individuals who have received their Ph.D. within the last seven (7) years. For individuals from colleges and universities worldwide pursuing archaeological research related to the ancient Greek world and adjacent areas through the application of interdisciplinary methods in the archaeological sciences. Stipend of $35,000 per year.
DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2020

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership

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2020 MAA Election: Voting is Open!

To the Members of the Medieval Academy:

Voting in the annual MAA governance election is now open. This one of the most important means that members have to impact both the MAA and the future of medieval studies in North America. I am very pleased to announce the names of the Medieval Academy members who have generously agreed to stand for election to office in 2020:

President: Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski (French, Emerita Univ. of Pittsburgh)
1st-VP: Thomas E. A. Dale (Art History, Univ. of Wisconsin)
2nd-VP: Maureen Miller (History, Univ. of California, Berkeley)

Councillors (four seats available, three-year term):

Lisa Bitel (Religion, University of Southern California)
Travis Bruce (History (Mediterranean Studies), McGill University)
William Caferro (History, Vanderbilt Univ.)
Seeta Chaganti (English, Univ. of California, Davis)
Elina Gertsman (Art History, Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Geraldine Heng (English & Comparative Literature, Univ. of Texas at Austin)
Laura Morreale (French and Italian, Independent Scholar)
Luisa Nardini (Musicology, Univ. of Texas at Austin)
Alison Perchuk (Art History, California State Univ. Channel Islands)
Sebastian Sobecki (English, University of Groningen)

Nominating Committee (two seats available, three-year term):

Alison Beach (History, The Ohio State University)
Matthew Desing (Spanish, Univ. of Texas, El Paso)
Andrew Rabin (English, Univ. of Louisville)
Cord Whitaker (English, Wellesley College)

Click here for more information about these candidates.

The election will be conducted in accordance with our By-Laws. The Nominating Committee is charged with nominating eight candidates for the four positions on the Council, balancing racial, gender, geographic, professional, and specialization diversity while also considering the same facets of the incumbents. Two additional candidates have been nominated by petition. There are four candidates for two openings on the Nominating Committee. As is our practice, the slate of three Presidential Officers is presented unopposed (this will change next year). Additional information about the governance of the Academy can be found on our FAQ page.

In addition to biographical information, each candidate has submitted a statement detailing their vision for the Academy and their reasons for wanting to participate in its governance. It is our hope that these statements will assist members in making informed choices about the governance of the Medieval Academy. These statements are online here.

As you consider these candidates, you may wish to take into account the demographics and specializations of the incumbents:

Council:
2018-2021:
Ray Clemens (Manuscript Studies, Beinecke Library, Yale Univ.)
Valerie Garver (History, Northern Illinois Univ.-DeKalb)
Lucy Pick (Religion, Univ. of Chicago)
Kathryn Smith (Art History, New York Univ.)

2019-2022:
Lynda Coon (History, Univ. of Arkansas)
Hussein Fancy (History, Univ. of Michigan)
Fiona Griffiths (History, Stanford Univ.)
Anne Latowsky (French/Latin, Univ. of South Florida)

Nominating Committee (2019-2020):
Sean Field (History, Univ. of Vermont) (Chair)
Jessica Goldberg (History, Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
Sif Rikhardsdottir (Comparative Literature, Univ. of Iceland)

My thanks to the Nominating Committee for their careful and thoughtful work in establishing the slate of Council candidates: Nicholas Watson (Chair), Robin Fleming, Jessica Goldberg, Sif Ríkharðsdóttir, and Catherine Saucier. My thanks as well to President Ruth Mazo Karras for proposing the slate of Nominating Committee candidates.

We are introducing a more secure online voting platform this year to ensure that voting is restricted to members of the Medieval Academy of America. When you follow the ballot link below, you will be asked to sign into your MAA account on our website in order to cast your vote. If you have forgotten your username or password, please contact us. You may only cast one ballot, and your ballot will be invalid if you vote for more than the allowable number of candidates indicated. The deadline for receipt of your vote is 2 January 2020. Finally, if you would prefer a paper ballot and have not requested one in the past, please let me know.

Click here to cast your vote in the 2020 MAA Governance Election:

https://www.medievalacademy.org/surveys/default.asp?id=2020_Election
Thank you for participating in the election.

– Lisa Fagin Davis, Executive Director

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Father Columba Stewart, OSB, to deliver 2019 Jefferson Lecture

COLLEGEVILLE, Minn. – Father Columba Stewart, OSB, executive director of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, will deliver the 2019 Jefferson Lecture to a distinguished national audience on Monday, October 7.

Established by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in 1972, the Jefferson Lecture is the highest honor bestowed by the Federal Government for contributions to the humanities. NEH awards this honor annually to an individual whose career exemplifies the utmost level of achievement in American intellectual and cultural life.

This is the first time the award has been given to a Minnesotan, a member of the clergy, or a Benedictine monk.

Previous Jefferson Lecturers include John Hope Franklin, Toni Morrison, David McCullough, Donald Kagan, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Ken Burns.

The lecture will take place at 7:30 p.m. (EDT) Monday, October 7, at the Warner Theatre in Washington, D.C. The title of the lecture is “Cultural Heritage Present and Future: A Benedictine Monk’s Long View.”

In his lecture, Fr. Columba will explain why preserving cultural heritage from other peoples and other times — such as the manuscripts he and his colleagues digitize to ensure their contents are safe despite the many threats to manuscript from weather, war, and civil unrest — is essential to the future of humankind. The stories contained in them offer a shared experience between cultures, making possible the intellectual engagement and debate necessary for mutual understanding. Such understanding, he says, is the only possible basis we have for moving away from fanaticism and ignorance, and toward the common good. 

Fr. Columba delivers this critical message by tracing HMML’s adventurous history, from its roots with the medieval Benedictine laboring in the scriptorium, to the modern monk hiding from armed militants in Timbuktu. The talk goes to the heart of the humanities: why cultural heritage is so valuable that people spend — and even risk — their lives to preserve them. 

Tickets to the lecture are free of charge and distributed on a first-come, first-served basis at www.neh.gov or (202) 606-8340. The event will be livestreamed at www.neh.gov and archived by the NEH.

Fr. Columba, a native of Houston, Texas, and a graduate of Harvard, Yale, and Oxford universities, is Professor of Theology at Saint John’s University School of Theology and Seminary. He has published and lectured extensively in his research field of early Christian monasticism. In 2009-10, he was the recipient of a year-long research fellowship from the NEH and a residential fellowship in Byzantine Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library in Washington, D.C. In 2016-17, he was awarded both a residency at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and a Guggenheim Fellowship for work on his upcoming book, “Between Earth and Heaven: Interpreting the Origins of Christian Asceticism and Monasticism.” He is also a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar for 2019-20, speaking about the work of HMML and his own research at colleges and universities across the United States.

Since becoming HMML’s executive director in 2003, Fr. Columba has traveled throughout the Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and South Asia, cultivating relationships with communities possessing historic manuscript collections from the early medieval to modern periods. Under his leadership, HMML has digitized over 150,000 manuscripts in many of the world’s most dangerous and inaccessible places, including northern Iraq, Syria, and the libraries of Timbuktu in Mali, covering a range of religious and cultural traditions. These texts and records are made available online through the Virtual HMML platform (vHMML.org).

“A ‘Monument Man’ of our time, Fr. Columba Stewart has dauntlessly rescued centuries’ worth of irreplaceable cultural heritage under threat from around the world,” said NEH Chairman Jon Parrish Peede. “In doing so, he and his colleagues have helped preserve the records of the religion, art, literature, culture, and knowledge of distant eras of human history so that we may celebrate and learn from those that came before us.”

A professed Benedictine monk of Saint John’s Abbey since 1981, Fr. Columba has become a recognized authority in the monastic and ecumenical worlds, having been appointed to the International Joint Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Oriental Orthodox Churches in 2009. Since 2018, he has been a resident scholar at the Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research.

Established in 1965, HMML is a global cultural organization whose mission is to preserve and share the world’s manuscript heritage. It has formed partnerships with over 580 libraries and archives worldwide. HMML has three areas of focus: digital preservation of rare and endangered manuscripts; cataloging and sharing the manuscripts online; and fostering research and education about the cultures that produced them. HMML curates exhibitions and hosts scholars, classes and workshops throughout the year and is the home of an internationally known handwritten and illuminated Bible in modern English, The Saint John’s Bible. HMML’s work is inspired by a 1500-year Benedictine tradition of cultural preservation.

Learn more about HMML and Fr. Columba at https://hmmlorg.com/

Saint John’s University is a Catholic liberal arts college for men with a graduate school of theology for women and men located in Collegeville, Minnesota.

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Jobs for Medievalists

Project Editor, Publications Department

The Publications Office of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) has an immediate full-time vacancy for a well-organized and highly motivated individual to be responsible for the production flow from raw manuscript to bound book of a major series of archaeological monographs.

Based in Princeton, NJ, the Editor will be part of a small, friendly team working closely with authors to produce publications of the highest quality. The successful candidate will have at least two years experience as a production, manuscript, or project editor, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, a sharp eye for detail, and an exceptional ability to organize workflow. Computer literacy is expected, a good knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite an advantage.

Minimum qualifications include a B.A. degree, preferably in Archaeology, Classics, or a related field. Excellent benefits, pleasant working conditions, salary commensurate with experience. Prospective applicants should submit a cover letter and resume (in pdf format) to Carol Stein, Director of Publications, castein@ascsa.org. The closing date for applications is October 15, 2019.

The ASCSA is an equal opportunity employer.

Link to online posting: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/about/staff/positions-available

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