Jobs for Medievalists

University of Notre Dame: College of Arts & Letters: Art, Art History and Design ART, Assistant or Associate Professor in Art History

Location: Notre Dame, IN

Closes: Oct 31, 2016

https://apply.interfolio.com/37065

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The Late Medieval Anatolian City, East of Byzantium Workshop, September 30, 2016

The Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, are pleased to announce the first workshop in the Studying East of Byzantium II workshop series:

Friday, September 30, 2016, 10:00 am–12:00 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

The Late Medieval Anatolian City: Urban Self-Governance and the Question of Democracy

A workshop for students considering the development of the city in late medieval Anatolia. Led by Rachel Goshgarian, Lafayette College

RSVP required. Additional information and registration at https://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/.

East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods.

Upcoming 2016–2017 Events:

Friday, October 21, 2016, 10:00 am–12:00 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Workshop: Anti-Jewish Polemic among Syriac Christians during the First Centuries of Islam, led by Aaron M. Butts, The Catholic University of America. Registration opens September 23, 2016.

Friday, November 18, 2016, 10:00 am–12:00 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Workshop: Which Nubia and Which Byzantium?, led by Giovanni R. Ruffini, Fairfield University. Registration opens October 21, 2016.

Friday, March 31, 2017, 9:30 am–5:30 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Symposium: Cultural Heritage Across the Christian East
Friday, April 7, 2017, 10:00 am–12:00 pm

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA
Workshop: East Syriac Christianity in the Mongol Empire, led by Mark Dickens, University of Alberta. Registration opens March 10, 2017.

For more information, please visit http://eastofbyzantium.org.

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Call for Papers”Othello’s Island”

CALL FOR PAPERS
5th Annual Multi-Disciplinary Conference
on Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

“OTHELLO’S ISLAND”

We wish to invite you, your colleagues and your research students to submit proposals to preseny#t papers to present at the 5th Annual Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, taking place in Nicosia, Cyprus, next April (2017).

The deadline for proposals is 31 December 2016.

Officially entitled “Othello’s Island”, the conference is a truely multi-disciplinary event, looking at all aspects of the Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern periods, including art, literature, history, culture etc.

Beging located in Nicosia, our delegates also have an opportunity to explore the medieval sites of this fascinating city, from the stunning Byzantine Museum to the richly carved sculptures of the French gothic cathedral, and we will also be taking a trip out of town to visit other medieval and renaissance sites of beauty and interest in Cyprus.

The conference is held at the Centre for Visual Arts and Research (CVAR) in the heart of Nicosia’s medieval Old Town, and is organised as a collaboration between academics from CVAR, Northern Arizona University, Sheffield Hallam University, SOAS University of London, the University of Kent, and the University of Leeds.

For research students and early career academics, we are able to offer a limited amount
of free accommodation for the duration of the conference to speakers aged 35 or under.

Our keynote speaker for 2017 will be Professor Patricia F. Brown (Princeton, USA).

For further information, please visit the website at:
www.othellosisland.org

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Call for Papers – “Hoccleve at Play”

Call for Papers— “Hoccleve at Play,” sponsored by the International Hoccleve Society, 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, 11-14 May 2017, Kalamazoo, Michigan

Since Thomas Hoccleve chose to set his “Compleinte,” the opening salvo of his five-poem Series, in the “broun sesoun of Mihelmesse” (an intentional inversion of Chaucer’s springtime “Aprill shoures”), critics of his poetry have been immersed in the depressive and disconsolate overtones of much of his verse. Hoccleve makes this easy—he dwells on his misspent youth and the infirmities of old age, bodily and financial.  Malcolm Richardson’s decades-old evaluation of Hoccleve as an “unfortunate poet,” a “slacker” and “failed bureaucrat” remains alive in much current scholarship which scours Hoccleve’s self-admitted defeats and disappointments for evidence of his commentary on fifteenth-century English politics and identity-politics.

While such avenues are certainly fertile, this panel seeks papers that probe Hoccleve’s jocular and imaginative side. What positive emotions are present in Hoccleve’s work, indicative of the humor he may have witnessed in everyday life? What metrical and rhetorical play and humorous subject matter does he engage with in his poetry and prose? We recognize that affect theory is opening new ground for finding meaning in Hoccleve’s expressed madness and rehabilitation, his emotional and psychological state, and the relationships between mental health and late medieval social experience.

Yet as Hoccleve’s existential crisis looms so large in scholarship it becomes hard to imagine the man simply existing at all. We seek another human side of this poet: the playful, the happy, the celebratory.

Jerome Mitchell once noted that “La male regle,” for example, develops a “humourous tone” inherent to the poet’s lived experiences. Affect theory advances this current of Hoccleve study that foregrounds the autobiographical subject—what Bobby Meyer-Lee calls the poet’s “textualization of his identity as a privy seal clerk.”  Studies of Hoccleve’s revelatory mode often resuscitate his poetic reputation by stressing his idiosyncratic manipulation of convention towards material, financial ends, as for example Ethan Knapp’s theories on Hoccleve’s participation in—and literary construction of—bureaucratic culture. Not only might Barbara Rosenwein’s concept of “emotional communities” shed light on Hoccleve’s self- and group-constructive rhetorical play, but it might produce a reading of his techniques alternative to the moods of begging or complaint that seem to prevail due to the the scribal nature of his poetic productions. Can we find instead an ironic rather than a workmanlike Hoccleve, performing rather than expressing emotion?

Some potential questions participants may wish to address include: Can Hoccleve’s claims to autobiography be inherently a pretense to gamesmanship?  His posing among shifting personas be fundamentally playful? Are his failures and faults intended as laughable farce, the awkward encounters in “Male regle” with untrustworthy tavern-keepers, prostitutes  and boatmen to be viewed as pranks? Could Hoccleve intend his self-scrutiny in front of the mirror in “My Compleinte” as over-the-top caricature or slapstick comedy? Is the interaction between Thomas and the Regiment prologue’s Old Man a farcical inversion of Boethian consolation, given the Old Man’s unsympathetic advice and insistent dominance of the conversation?  When he complains in the Regiment prologue that most people do not understand the difficulty of scribal work but “holde it but a game,” is Hoccleve himself playing a game—a game of contrasting the alienating or solipsizing act of scribal labor to its social cure, poetry?  Is the bureaucratic emotional community one joined by playful poetizing as much as it is by poetic petition, resistant to the commodifying pressures of bureaucratic documentation and patronized poetry?  Is poetry an escape for the Late Medieval renaissance man, a place for aesthetic play rather than a tool for doing work in the world? How might we model a hermeneutics of humor in Hoccleve’s collected works?

We look forward to your interpretations of how Hoccleve shares a laugh with his cohort. Please send one-page abstracts along with a Participant Information Form (https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to hocclevesociety@gmail.com by 15 September 2016.  Inquiries also welcome.

Call for Papers— “Teaching Hoccleve,” a roundtable sponsored by the International Hoccleve Society, 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, 11-14 May 2017, Kalamazoo, Michigan

There is a subtle irony in the fact that Thomas Hoccleve, whose corpus of early fifteenth-century poems is saturated with the concepts of recovery and rehabilitation, has been at the center of a decades-long process of poetic and pedagogic rehabilitation in university English departments. No longer brushed aside as a mere epigone of Geoffrey Chaucer, the traditional nucleus of Medieval English literature syllabi, Hoccleve now claims a legitimate place in the late medieval canon.  But what is that place exactly, as far as college classrooms go? The International Hoccleve Society wishes to evaluate current and potential uses of Hoccleve’s poetry in literature, comparative literature, and history curricula.  We appeal to instructors to share their experiences teaching Hoccleve to various sorts of university undergraduate, graduate, and secondary-school classrooms, and to recommend lesson plans, assignments and in-class exercises, and pedagogical approaches to Hoccleve’s oeuvre.

One goal is to evaluate the effects of institutional contexts of instruction, for instance the experience of teaching Hoccleve at four-year universities versus community colleges, within history versus literature departments, and for survey courses versus upper-level seminars. What do students find entertaining or surprising about his poetry, and what difficult?  What does this teach us about the size of Hoccleve’s rightful place in a syllabus on medieval or late medieval subject matter?  Is he rightfully taught as a subordinate within a a post-Chaucerian framework, or can one envision an upper-level undergraduate or graduate literature course focused on Hoccleve? What would that look like?

Secondly, we wish participants to discuss Hoccleve’s role in critical paradigms, including how his poetry might usefully illustrate (or be illustrated by) theories like new historicism, new formalism, feminist and queer theory, narratology, cultural studies, postcolonialism, affect theory, or deconstruction. What opportunities does Hoccleve provide students in questioning medieval genre, periodization, popular spirituality, administrative culture, socio-economic class structures, urban life, political commentary and resistance, or the rise of the individual?  Is Hoccleve a useful nexus for interdisciplinarity?

Please send one-page abstracts along with a Participant Information Form (https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to hocclevesociety@gmail.com by 15 September 2016.  Inquiries also welcome.

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Call for Proposals – “Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation”

Call for Proposals
“Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation”
Session Organizer: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Saturday, 14 October 2017, 10:45am–12:15pm
Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference
12–15 October 2017, Philadelphia, PA

This panel takes as its premise the idea that far from being a neutral container, the whole book and its ‘matrix’—physical form, contents, makers, readers, and history of use—are fundamental to the construction of meaning. By exploring the relationships between texts (broadly conceived) and the books and manuscripts in which they take form as material objects, we seek to highlight intersections between textual criticism, codicology, paleography, and bibliography. Of particular interest are proposals that address the following: How does a book’s physical structure (collation, format, etc.) shape the reading experience? What can analysis of one (or more) specific aspects of a book’s material form (binding, support material, ink and pigments, etc) tell us about the reception of a given text and/or about its creator’s authorial status? Submissions from scholarly professionals in a wide range of fields and disciplines (e.g., literary studies, musicology, history, art history, curation, conservation, book arts, the rare book trade, etc.) are welcome. Presentations that are interdisciplinary in approach and subject matter are especially encouraged. During this conference session, three participants will give 20-minute presentations, followed by a half-hour discussion led by a moderator.

Please submit a proposal of no more than 500 words by 25 October 2016 at:

rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-papers

Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference, will bring together scholarly professionals poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The program aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. Bibliography Among the Disciplines is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and organized by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School. For more information, please visit: rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-2017

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MAA News – Postdoctoral Editorial Fellowship at Speculum

speculumApplications are now being accepted for a two-year Postdoctoral Editorial Fellowship at Speculum, the journal of the Medieval Academy of America.

The Speculum fellowship represents a significant fulfillment of one aspect of the Medieval Academy’s continuing efforts to recognize and support extraordinary medievalists in the early stages of their careers. We believe that after the fellowship tenure, the Speculum fellow will be a more experienced scholar and editor and will be an exceptionally attractive candidate for academic positions, as well as for significant publishing and editorial opportunities.

This two-year full-time post at Speculum, which will begin 1 July 2017, offers qualified individuals the opportunity to develop as scholars and editors. The term of the award is subject to the Fellow’s acceptable performance of the duties required, as determined by the Editor of Speculum. Fellows will receive:

  • $43,000 annual stipend
  • Health benefits
  • Special Borrower’s privileges at Widener Library, Harvard University
  • Limited travel funds

Fellows are expected to:

  • Continue to develop research program 1 day/ week.
  • Assume responsibilities for a particular set of editorial tasks at Speculum. These tasks will include, but are not limited to: liaising with book review editors; contacting reviewers; checking citations for accepted articles; proofreading reviews, Brief Notices, Books Received, and Tables of Contents, and entering corrections; proofing full issues of Speculum
  • Participate in the cultural life of medieval studies in the Boston area.
  • Reside in the Boston area during the fellowship period.

Eligible candidates must meet the following requirements and demonstrate the following qualifications:

  • PhD in some field of medieval studies completed before the end of spring term, 2017, but no earlier than January 1, 2011
  • Attention to detail and evidence of a high level of scholarly precision, particularly with regards to bibliographic detail
  • Strong work ethic
  • Facility with languages
  • Demonstrated ability to manage large amounts of digital information

The deadline for applications is 15 October. Click here for more information and to apply.

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MAA News – Book Prize Deadlines

"Dante and Virgil in Conversation," from Oxford: Bodleian Library, MS. Holkham Misc. 48, p. 67. © Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

“Dante and Virgil in Conversation,” from Oxford: Bodleian Library, MS. Holkham Misc. 48, p. 67. © Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

Haskins Medal
The Haskins Medal is awarded annually by the Medieval Academy of America for a distinguished book in the field of medieval studies. First presented in 1940, the award honors Charles Homer Haskins, the noted medieval historian, who was a founder of the Medieval Academy and its second President. The award is announced at the annual meeting of the Academy each spring. The medal was designed in 1939 by Graham Carey. (Deadline 15 October 2016)

John Nicholas Brown Prize
The John Nicholas Brown Prize, established by the Medieval Academy of America in 1978, is awarded annually for a first book or monograph on a medieval subject judged by the selection committee to be of outstanding quality. To be eligible, the author must be resident in North America.

John Nicholas Brown was one of the founders of the Medieval Academy and for fifty years served as its Treasurer. The prize established in his name consists of a certificate and a monetary award of $1,000. It is announced at the annual meeting of the academy each spring. (Deadline 15 October 2016)

Van Courtlandt Elliott Prize
The Van Courtlandt Elliott Prize, established by the Medieval Academy of America in 1971, is awarded annually for a first article in the field of medieval studies, published in a scholarly journal, judged by the selection committee to be of outstanding quality. To be eligible, the author must be resident in North America. Van Courtlandt Elliott was Executive Secretary of the Academy and Editor of Speculum from 1965 to 1970. The prize that bears his name consists of a certificate and a monetary award of $500. It is announced at the annual meeting of the academy each spring. (Deadline 15 October 2016)

Medieval Academy of America Digital Humanities Prize
In the spring of 2017, the Academy will award the first annual MAA Digital Humanities Prize to one outstanding digital research project in Medieval Studies. The prize is not meant to aid development of digital projects but instead to reward successful and innovative digital projects. The recipient (i.e. the Principal Investigator) will receive a cash prize of $1000, to be awarded at the 2017 Annual Meeting.

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MAA News – Call for Fellows Nominations

shieldTo the Members of the Medieval Academy:

Members are hereby invited to submit nominations for Fellows and Corresponding Fellows of the Medieval Academy of America. Fellows and Corresponding Fellows are senior scholars who have made notable contributions to the field of Medieval Studies.

Fellows will cast ballots in December and January for the 2017 election, which will operate under by-laws and procedures adopted in 2013 and revised in 2015. Under the established rules, four slots are currently available, for which there must be at least eight nominations. There is no established minimum number of nominations for Corresponding Fellows.

Nominations for the 2017 elections must be received by 5 December 2016.

Instructions for nominations are available here:

http://www.medievalacademy.org/?page=Election_Procedure

Lists of Fellows, Corresponding Fellows and Emeriti/ae Fellows are available here:

http://www.medievalacademy.org/?page=Fellows

Nominations should be submitted to the Executive Director at LFD@TheMedievalAcademy.org or mailed to:

Lisa Fagin Davis, Executive Director
Medieval Academy of America
17 Dunster St., Suite 202
Cambridge, Mass., 02138

Please note that nominations are to be kept in strictest confidence, from the nominee as well as from others.

– Mary Carruthers, President of the Fellows

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MAA News – Upcoming MAA Fellowship and Grant Deadlines

Tripoli, Bohemond VI or VII, gold bezant, 1251-87. Courtesy of Princeton University Numismatic Collection.

Tripoli, Bohemond VI or VII, gold bezant, 1251-87. Courtesy of Princeton University Numismatic Collection.

The Medieval Academy of America has long provided a variety of benefits of membership, including numerous fellowships, prizes and grants for travel, research and publications. Please see the list below for prizes and fellowships with looming deadlines, then follow the links for complete descriptions and application information. We encourage all eligible members to apply for these grants. Please note that you MUST be a member in good standing as of Sept. 15 in order to be eligible for MAA awards.

We are pleased to announce that as of August 2015 all applications for Medieval Academy prizes, awards, and fellowships can (and must) be submitted using our online application system. Links to each form can be found on the Awards section of our website.

Schallek Fellowship
The Schallek Fellowship provides a one-year grant of $30,000 to support Ph.D. dissertation research in any relevant discipline dealing with late-medieval Britain (ca. 1350-1500). (Deadline 15 October 2016)

Travel Grants
The Medieval Academy provides a limited number of travel grants to help Academy members who hold doctorates but are not in full-time faculty positions, or are adjuncts without access to institutional funding, attend conferences to present their work. (Deadline 1 November 2016 for meetings to be held between 16 February and 31 August 2017)

Kindrick-CARA Award for Outstanding Service to Medieval Studies
The Robert L. Kindrick-CARA Award for Outstanding Service to Medieval Studies recognizes Medieval Academy members who have provided leadership in developing, organizing, promoting, and sponsoring medieval studies through the extensive administrative work that is so crucial to the health of medieval studies but that often goes unrecognized by the profession at large. This award of $1000 is presented at the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy. (Deadline 15 November 2016)

CARA Award for Excellence in Teaching
The CARA Award for Excellence in Teaching Medieval Studies recognizes Medieval Academy members who are outstanding teachers who have contributed to the profession by inspiring students at the undergraduate or graduate levels or by creating innovative and influential textbooks or other materials for teaching medieval subjects. (Deadline 15 November 2016)

Please see the MAA website for other grants and prizes offered by the Academy.

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MAA News – Call for Papers at Kalamazoo

Call for Papers: MAA Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017

The Medieval Academy of America seeks proposals for two sponsored sessions at the 2017 International Congress on Medieval Studies, on the topic of “Mobility of Things and Persons.” These sessions will build on the Medieval Academy of America plenary lecture, to be delivered by Leor HaLevi (Vanderbilt Univ.).

I: “Cross-Cultural Images and Crafts: Transcultural Objects and Artisanal Migration”

II: “Trading with Infidels: Legal Approaches to Interfaith Commerce.”

Please send proposals with a one-page abstract and Participant Information Form (https://wmich.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/u434/2016/medieval-pif-2017.pdf) to Sara Lipton (sara.lipton@stonybrook.edu) by September 15, 2016.

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