Call for Papers – Texts and Contexts Conference

Texts and Contexts is an annual conference held on the campus of the Ohio State University devoted to Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, incunables and early printed texts in Latin and the vernacular languages. The conference solicits papers particularly in the general discipline of manuscript studies, including palaeography, codicology, reception and text history. In addition to the general papers (of roughly 20 minutes), the conference also hosts the Virginia Brown Memorial Lecture, established in memory of the late Virginia Brown, who taught paleography at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies for some 40 years. We also welcome proposals for sessions of two to three papers which might treat a more focused topic. Please send abstracts to epig@osu.edu.  Deadline for abstracts: August 1, 2017.

Virginia Brown Memorial Lecture 2017: James Hankins, Harvard University

Posted in Call for Papers | Leave a comment

Call for Papers – New Research on Hirsau in the Middle Ages

An international workshop will take place at the monastery of Hirsau on 9 and 10 November 2017.  This interdisciplinary workshop will provide a platform for scholars at all career stages to present and discuss their research on this important center of monastic reform in Germany’s Black Forest. We welcome abstracts for projects in the areas of history, theology, art history or music history. Young scholars are particularly encouraged to apply.

Please send a brief (max. 1 page) abstract describing your proposed project to Prof. Alison Beach at beach.174@osu.edu by 30 April. Those invited to present a project will receive free accommodation in Hirsau. We regret that we cannot cover travel expenses (or only to a limited extent).

Organizers: Alison Beach (Ohio State University), Sigrid Hirbodian (Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen); Stefan Molitor (Staatsarchiv Ludwigsburg), in partnership with the Verein Freunde Kloster Hirsau eV.

Posted in Call for Papers | Leave a comment

Call for Applications SIMS Visiting Research Fellowship

The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies (SIMS) is now accepting applications for the 2017-2018 Visiting Research Fellowship program. Guided by the vision of its founders, Lawrence J. Schoenberg and Barbara Brizdle Schoenberg, SIMS aims to bring manuscript culture, modern technology, and people together to provide access to and understanding of our shared intellectual heritage.  Part of the Penn Libraries, SIMS oversees an extensive collection of pre-modern manuscripts from around the world, with a special focus on the history of philosophy and science, and creates open-access digital content to support the study of its collections.  SIMS also hosts the Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts and the annual Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

The SIMS Visiting Research Fellowships have been established to encourage research relating to the pre-modern manuscript collections at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, including the Schoenberg Collection.  Affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, located near other manuscript-rich research collections (the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and the Rosenbach Museum and Library, among many others), and linked to the local and international scholarly communities, SIMS offers fellows a network of resources and opportunities for collaboration. Fellows will be encouraged to interact with SIMS staff, Penn faculty, and other medieval and early modern scholars in the Philadelphia area. Fellows will also be expected to present their research at Penn Libraries either during the term of the fellowship or on a selected date following the completion of the term.

Applications are due May 1, 2017. More information on eligibility and the application process is available here: https://schoenberginstitute.org/visiting-research-fellowships-2 .

For more information on SIMS, go to http://schoenberginstitute.org/. On Penn’s pre-modern manuscript holdings in general, go to: http://dla.library.upenn.edu/dla/medren.

 

Posted in Fellowships | Leave a comment

Jobs for Medievalists

AHRC PhD studentship in collaboration with The British Library (Medieval Manuscripts) and The University of Leicester – ‘England and France 700–1200: Franco-Saxon Manuscripts in the Ninth Century’.

University of Leicester

Location: London / Leicester

Closes: 10 April 2017 (midday, London time)

ENGLAND AND FRANCE 700–1200: FRANCO-SAXON MANUSCRIPTS IN THE NINTH CENTURY

The British Library and the University of Leicester invite applications for a PhD studentship offered under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership programme, co-supervised by Joanna Story, professor of Early Medieval History at Leicester, and Dr Kathleen Doyle, Lead Curator of Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library. This studentship, funded at standard AHRC rates, begins on 1 October 2017 and is based at the British Library in London.

Franco-Saxon Manuscripts in the ninth century

In the ninth century monasteries in the Pas de Calais, at Saint-Amand, Saint-Bertin, Corbie, and Saint-Riquier produced manuscripts that were characterised by the use of a highly distinctive style of ‘Franco-Saxon’ illumination. These monasteries were places of great wealth and patronage, and were ruled by abbots who had close links to the Carolingian court. Proximity to the Channel coast and to the trading emporium of Quentovic meant that there were also longstanding connections with Anglo-Saxon England. These links to places and people of power are manifest in the deluxe manuscripts that were produced in these monasteries in the ninth century, which combined the measured aesthetic of Carolingian epigraphic display scripts with an idiomatic use of Insular decoration.

This project offers opportunities for detailed historical research and direct engagement with manuscripts that reveal connections between England and France through texts, decoration, script and methods of manufacture. The project will focus on books in the British Library, and on codices that exemplify the Franco-Saxon style housed in London and elsewhere. The student will work with the supervisors to develop the project in ways that complement and extend their existing skills-set and interests.

Click here for more info.

 

Posted in Jobs for Medievalists | Leave a comment

Registration Open: Summer School Digital Editing and Digital Humanities

The Summer School in Digital Editing and Digital Humanities in Grenoble (26th of June to 1st of July 2017) is now open for registration at the following address: https://edeen.sciencesconf.org/registration/index. The Summer School is organised by the University of Grenoble-Alpes together with the Maison de Sciences de l’Homme-Alpes and with the sponsorship of ITN DIXIT.

The programme of the summer school can be seen from https://edeen.sciencesconf.org/program/graphic (to see the details of the parallel sessions from Wednesday on onward, click on the individual days on top, or on the List link). The language of teaching is either French or Italian: please check on the description of each course to see in which language that course will be taught: https://edeen.sciencesconf.org/resource/page/id/6. The list of confirmed teachers can be seen from https://edeen.sciencesconf.org/resource/page/id/1

Registration is free of charge but capped at 40 participants; for the parallel sessions the cap is at 15 participants for each workshop. Please remember that if you register and then you do not attend, you will stop someone else from attending.

PhD students can apply for a bursary of up to €400 (upon presentation of receipts); all bursaries are sponsored by the DiXiT Network (http://dixit.uni-koeln.de/). To apply for a bursary, please fill out the relevant information on the registration form. The deadline to apply for a bursary is the 30th of April.

Posted in Summer Programs | Leave a comment

Call for Papers – Charlemagne’s Ghost: Legacies, Leftovers, and Legends of the Carolingian Empire

Charlemagne’s Ghost: Legacies, Leftovers, and Legends of the Carolingian Empire

44th Annual New England Medieval Conference
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
Saturday, October 7, 2017

Keynote Speaker:
Simon MacLean, University of St. Andrews, “What Was Post-Carolingian about Post-Carolingian Europe?”

It is well known that the Frankish emperor Charlemagne (768-814) and his dynasty – the Carolingians – played an important role in the formation of Europe. Yet scholars still debate the long-term consequences of the collapse of the Carolingian empire in 888 and the diverse ways in which Charlemagne’s family shaped subsequent medieval civilization. This conference invites medievalists of all disciplines and specializations to investigate the legacies, leftovers, and legends of the Carolingian empire in the central and later Middle Ages. We welcome papers that consider a wide array of Carolingian legacies in the realms of kingship and political culture, literature and art, manuscripts and material artifacts, the Church and monasticism, as well as Europe’s relations with the wider world. We urge participants to reflect on the ways in which later medieval rulers, writers, artists, and communities remembered Charlemagne and the Frankish empire and adapted Carolingian inheritances to fit new circumstances. In short, this conference will explore the ways in which Charlemagne’s ghost haunted the medieval world.

Please send an abstract of 250 words and a CV to Eric Goldberg (egoldber@mit.edu) via email attachment. On your abstract provide your name, institution, the title of your proposal, and email address. Abstracts are due July 1, 2017.

Posted in Call for Papers | Leave a comment

Conferences – The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange

In collaboration with the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Madrid and Princeton’s departments of Art & Archaeology and History, the Index of Christian Art will sponsor a two-day interdisciplinary conference, “The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange,” on 19-20 May 2017.

The medieval treasury offers an extraordinary material witness to the desires, aspirations, and self-conception of its creators. Treasuries could function as sources of gifts (and obligations) for their allies, as prestigious private storehouses for ostentation before an elite audience, or as financial reserves that could be made use of in times of need. Luxury items from non-Christian cultures, such as the many Islamic objects that found their way into church treasuries, or those made from materials of great intrinsic value, such as ivory, gold, silver, or silk, became even more valuable if the piece were turned to a sacred use. We will examine these dimensions of the treasury by giving special emphasis to the rich holdings of the royal-sponsored monastery of San Isidoro de León in northern Spain. Taken as a whole, both texts and objects offer a rich body of evidence for interdisciplinary investigation and serve as a springing point for larger questions about sumptuary collections and their patrons across Europe and the Mediterranean during the central Middle Ages.

Hosted at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, the conference brings together international and US scholars from multiple disciplines and professions, with specializations including Islamic law and sumptuary production, Christian chronicles, patronage and royal studies, identity and gender studies, and political history across the cultures of medieval Spain. The diversity of questions and perspectives addressed by these scholars will shed light on the nature of treasury collections, as well as on the broad efficacy of multidisciplinary study for the Middle Ages.

For further information, contact Pamela Patton: ppatton@princeton.edu

SPEAKERS

THOMAS BURMAN, ROBERT M. CONWAY DIRECTOR OF THE MEDIEVAL INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME
“Seeing and Not Seeing Islam in Twelfth-Century Europe”

ANA CABRERA, VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM, AND MARÍA JUDITH FELICIANO, INDEPENDENT SCHOLAR AND DIRECTOR, “MEDIEVAL TEXTILES IN IBERIA AND THE MEDITERRANEAN”
“Medieval Textiles in León in the Iberian and Mediterranean Context”

JERRILYNN DODDS, SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE
“The Treasury, Beyond Interaction”

AMANDA DOTSETH, MEADOWS MUSEUM, SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY AND PRADO MUSEUM, MADRID
“Medieval Treasure and the Modern Museum: Christian and Islamic Objects from San Isidoro de León”

MARIBEL FIERRO, INSTITUTO DE LENGUAS Y CULTURAS DEL MEDITERRÁNEO Y ORIENTE PRÓXIMO, CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTÍFICAS
“Christian Relics in al-Andalus”

JULIE HARRIS, SPERTUS INSTITUTE FOR JEWISH LEARNING AND LEADERSHIP
“Jews, Real and Imagined, at San Isidoro and Beyond”

EVA HOFFMAN, DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ART HISTORY, TUFTS UNIVERSITY
“Arabic Script as Text and Image on Treasury Objects across the Medieval Mediterranean”

JITSKE JASPERSE, INSTITUTO DE HISTORIA, CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTÍFICAS
“Set in Stone: Questioning the Portable Altar of the Infanta Sancha (d. 1159)”

BEATRICE KITZINGER, DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
“The Treasury, a Material Witness to Long-Distance Contact and Pivot Point for Interdisciplinary Exchange”

EDUARDO MANZANO, INSTITUTO DE HISTORIA, CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTÍFICAS
“Beyond the Year 900: The ‘Iron Century’ or an Era of Silk?”

THERESE MARTIN, INSTITUTO DE HISTORIA, CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTÍFICAS
“Ivory Assemblage as Visual Metaphor: The Beatitudes Casket in Context”

PAMELA A. PATTON, INDEX OF CHRISTIAN ART, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
“Demons and Diversity in León”

ANA RODRÍGUEZ, INSTITUTO DE HISTORIA, CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTÍFICAS
“Narrating the Treasury: What Medieval Iberian Chronicles Choose to Tell Us about Luxury Objects”

ITTAI WEINRYB, BARD GRADUATE CENTER
“The Idea of North”

https://ica.princeton.edu/conferences/

Posted in Conferences | Leave a comment

Announcing Fellowships at The Boston Athenæum

The Boston Athenæum offers short-term fellowships to support the use of Athenæum collections for research, publication, curriculum and program development, or other creative projects. Each fellowship pays a stipend of $1,500 for a residency of twenty days (four weeks) and includes a year’s membership to the Boston Athenæum. Scholars, graduate students, independent scholars, teaching faculty, and professionals in the humanities as well as teachers and librarians in secondary public, private, and parochial schools are eligible. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals holding the appropriate U.S. government documents. Applications are due April 15, 2017.

Applicants should use the online form at the link below to be considered for the Athenæum’s fellowships due April 15. You need not submit multiple applications; all applicants will be considered for each fellowship.

 http://www.bostonathenaeum.org/form/fellowship-application-form

 The Boston Athenæum, a membership library, first opened its doors in 1807, and its rich history as a library and cultural institution has been well documented in the annals of Boston’s cultural life. Today, it remains a vibrant and active institution that serves a wide variety of members and scholars. Members take advantage of its large and distinguished circulating collection, a newspaper and magazine reading room, the exquisite fifth floor reading room, quiet spaces and rooms for reading and researching, a children’s library, and wireless internet access throughout its building. The Special Collections resources are world-renowned and include maps, manuscripts, rare books, and archival materials.

 Please search for more information on fellowships on the website:

http://www.bostonathenaeum.org/library/fellowships

Posted in Fellowships | Leave a comment

Conferences – Aspectus and Affectus: Robert Grosseteste, Understanding and Feeling Conference

The Georgetown University Department of Philosophy and the Ordered Universe project (https://ordered-universe.com/) will be hosting a conference at Georgetown University on March 31-April 1, 2017, and a public lecture, Modern Science, Medieval Studies and Art in Dialogue: Bishop Robert Grosseteste’s (c. 1170-1253) Scientific World of Light, Sound and the Big Bang, followed by a reception on March 31. The public is invited to attend both events.

The conference will explore the notions of understanding and feeling through the lens of Robert Grosseteste’s (c. 1170-1253) philosophical, scientific, and theological works. Grosseteste treats these notions in terms of a conception of the aspectus and affectus of the soul, a signature distinction employed throughout his career. Even so, these terms have longer histories of use and interpretation in the Middle Ages in both philosophy and spiritual contexts. The conference will be interdisciplinary in nature and feature papers from a wide range of disciplines, with international speakers, on the various themes raised by consideration of aspectus and affectus. Papers consider other uses of the terms in philosophical accounts of how the human mind works and in twelfth-century monastic writing, the inheritance from St. Augustine as used by Grosseteste in his treatise On the Liberal Arts, his collection of Dicta, and his Hexaemeron. Other fruitful avenues for exploring the implications of aspectus and affectus include medieval Arabic philosophy of science, and modern philosophy and science of perception and motivation.

For further details please visit the conference website https://ordered-universe.com/aspectus-and-affectus/ or contact the conference organizer, Prof. Neil Lewis, at lewisn@georgetown.edu.

Posted in Conferences | Leave a comment

20th International Colloquium of the Comité international de paléographie latine

20th International Colloquium of the Comité international de paléographie latine:
Scribes and the Presentation of Texts Antiquity-ca. 1550

The 20th international colloquium of the Comité international de paléographie latine, hosted by the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library with the support of the Institute of Sacred Music (both at Yale University), will explore how generations of scribes adapted the forms of writing to new texts, new audiences and new functions, across centuries and geographical locations.

The traditions and decisions of scribes in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Renaissance as to the best way of presenting different texts had a major influence on the development of books and documents as material, visual, intellectual and social artifacts. Their work can be interpreted as a constant quest for the optimal balance between modes of production and use, in the choice and preparation of materials, layout and decoration, scripts and orthography.

Registration and further information are available here:
http://www.cvent.com/d/mvqvsm

Posted in Annual Meeting | Leave a comment